Patterns of participation in the Grow parenting program

Publication Journal:
Journal of Children’s Services
Publication Year:
2019
Author(s):
Czymoniewicz-Klippel, M. T., Chesnut, R. P., DiNallo, J. M., & Perkins, D. F.
Abstract:

Employing brief, low-intensity, face-to-face parenting programs can result in improvements in parenting and child behavior; however, their usefulness is often limited by low participation rates. Online technologies are increasingly presented as a panacea for promoting program reach in a cost-effective way. The extant literature, however, provides limited guidance on issues around the implementation of online parenting programs. Grow is a universal, health-promoting parenting program that targets families with 5–10 year olds and was developed for face-to-face delivery and then adapted for a web-based format. The purpose of this paper is to present implementation results from feasibility proof of concept studies of Grow Face-to-Face and Grow Online and explores issues regarding mode of delivery and parent participation.

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The Grow parenting program: Demonstrating proof of concept

Publication Journal:
Health Education
Publication Year:
2018
Author(s):
Chesnut, R.P., DiNallo, J.M., Czymoniewicz-Klippel, M.T., & Perkins, D.F.
Abstract:

Parent-focused interventions (PFIs) are a promising method for supporting parents and promoting children’s well-being. Few PFIs in the USA, however, include physical health promotion content and are universal programs. The purpose of this paper is to describe a universal health-promoting PFI for parents of elementary school-aged children and demonstrate proof of concept.

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Evidence-informed program development: Using a common components approach to develop universal parenting programs for U.S. military and civilian families

Publication Journal:
Children and Youth Services Review
Publication Year:
2018
Author(s):
Czymoniewicz-Klippel, M. T., Chesnut, R. P., DiNallo, J. M., & Perkins, D. F.
Abstract:

Program development is a complex, iterative process involving multiple steps and decision points. This article presents the common components approach as comparatively efficient, heuristic tool for deciding what content to include in a new program on the basis of current manualized evidence-based programs, alongside theory, basic research findings, and professional judgment. A case study of how this approach was used to develop a universal parenting program for U.S. military and civilian parents of infants (birth to 12 months) is presented. Lessons learned in applying a common components methodology to program development and implications for others who are interested in using the approach in their program work are also discussed.

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Understanding the implementation of the Grow! parenting program: Findings from a mixed methods pilot study

Publication Journal:
Children and Youth Services Review
Publication Year:
2017
Author(s):
Czymoniewicz-Klippel, M. T., Chesnut, R. P., DiNallo, J. M., & Perkins, D. F.
Abstract:

Evaluating the implementation of parenting interventions is critical to program diffusion and quality across populations and settings, and to enhancing treatment outcomes. This article presents implementation findings from a pilot study of Grow!, a universal parenting program targeting parents of five to eight years olds that aims to improve child outcomes through strengthened parenting. Grow! was implemented at two community sites in central Pennsylvania by trained facilitators. Implementation data was gathered from facilitators and participants using mixed methods, including surveys, observation checklists, semi-structured interviews, and focus group discussions. These data were analyzed and integrated to explore, within the context of Proctor et al.’s (2011) implementation outcome framework, four implementation outcomes (i.e., acceptability, appropriateness, fidelity, and feasibility). Overall, these findings demonstrate that Grow! can be, and was, implemented effectively in a community setting. Moreover, they demonstrate how the Proctor et al. (2011) framework can be operationalized and applied specifically to hybrid effectiveness-implementation design studies.

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Grow Online: feasibility and proof of concept study

Publication Journal:
Journal of Children’s Services
Publication Year:
2019
Author(s):
Chesnut, R. P., Czymoniewicz-Klippel, M., DiNallo, J. M., & Perkins, D. F.
Abstract:

Digitally delivered, parent-focused interventions (DD-PFIs) are viewed as an important method for supporting child well-being. Few DD-PFIs include health-promotion and general-parenting content, and only some are intended for a universal audience. The purpose of this paper is to focus on a preliminary evaluation of Grow Online, which was designed to address this gap.

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